Uncategorized

Moving on to the Next Big Thing

Well, it’s all over folks…I’ve been through the wringer of grad school and have come out relatively unscathed. I, and 16 other fabulous makers/designers/artists/craftsmen/gluttons-for-punishment, graduated with our MFAs a couple of weeks ago. Just last night we wrapped up our Practicum exhibition, Mixed Messages, which, I must say, looked damn good (see images of my work and Practicum pieces, Everything Falls Apart but Nothing Ever Does <parts I and II>, below). I continue to be impressed, even after two years, with this group’s ability to collaborate and execute some pretty daunting projects, especially considering each one represented 17 distinct voices.

So what next? That’s the question on everyone’s lips. Well, I chose this program partially because of its emphasis on cultivating an entrepreneurial approach to making a living while making difference. About half way through this program I realized my professional life would likely take a multi-faceted form, combining self-employment and traditional job opportunities. It goes without saying that I want to continue making and then exhibit and sell that work (just don’t ask me what I want to make…my head is a bit scrambled right now). I also want to connect with the greater community and build upon the network of artists and makers that grad school has helped me develop.

It’s going to be tough right out of the gate, but, luckily, things seem to be falling into place for me. I have a few opportunities on the table right now, including a sweet part-time gig assisting an amazing local artist, Dana Louis. I have a couple good leads for part-time and full-time job opportunities with local art/craft/manufacturing companies, and I’ve spotted a couple of potential spaces for my next studio. Things are coming together…

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Public Art, Shows, Uncategorized

Coming Soon: Design with the Other 90%: CITIES

Praça Cantão, Favela Painting Project
Artists: Jeroen Koolhaas and Dre Urhahn, Haas&Hahn, with Santa Marta favela community youth. Santa Marta, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2009–10. Photo: © Haas&Hahn for favelapainting.com

Design with the Other 90%: CITIES opens this weekend in Portland.  The exhibit is actually divided between two locations, the Museum of Contemporary Craft and the Mercy Corps Action Center.  Here’s a snippet from MoCC’s site about what we can expect from this exhibit:

…explores innovative approaches in urban planning, sustainable design, affordable housing, entrepreneurship, nonformal education, and public health happening in these communities to ensure their residents a brighter future. CITIES features sixty projects, products, and proposals, organized into six themes, that shine the spotlight on communities, designers, and architects, as well as private, civic, and public organizations that are working together to address the complex issues arising from the unprecedented growth of informal settlements in emerging and developing economies.

I am very much looking forward to this show, as it ties directly in with themes I’ll be exploring as a graduate student, beginning in just a couple of weeks.

Grad School, Uncategorized

Finally…Grad School!

The big news: after 10 years of dreaming, scheming, creating, fretting, failing, discovering, and succeeding, I’m going to art school!  This fall l will enroll as a student in the MFA in Applied Craft and Design program offered, in collaboration, by the Pacific Northwest College of Art and the Oregon College of Art and Craft in the great city of Portland, Oregon.  I say “this fall,” but my program begins this Monday, 8/20, with a two-week design/build project, in which all in-coming grad students are suddenly thrown together to create a space with a very real purpose for a very real client.

I nearly fell out of my chair when I heard we will be building a Bike Hub, a community bike center, in the New Columbia neighborhood of North Portland.  This project has been years in the making, thanks in large part to the Community Cycling Center, a local non-profit which believes “the bicycle is a tool for empowerment and a vehicle for change.” Since I found inspiration in the Netherlands last summer I’ve come to believe quite strongly that safe, accessible forms of active transportation, like bicycling, are vital to the formation and longevity of vibrant communities and the overall livability of our city.  The coincidence or serendipity of the chain of events which has led me to this program is simply remarkable.  Never in a million years could I have planned this!

What attracted me to the Applied Craft + Design program can be summed up this way:

With a curriculum focused on the development of a strong artistic voice, the realization of work for a specific community or client, and entrepreneurism that connects making a living with making a difference, the MFA in Applied Craft and Design is the only graduate program of its kind.

I contemplated a more traditional route: a highly-ranked ceramics MFA program at an established school like the University of Nebraska or the University of Minnesota.  These excellent programs have a highly competitive admissions process, many artists applying year after year before gaining entrance (because dozens or hundreds of artists are vying for maybe 1-4 spots in the program each year).  While some pretty incredible artists emerge from these programs, they focus on the individual artist and do not, as a facet of the program, emphasize the relationship between the artist and his/her community.  I believe, in the end, this may be to the detriment of future artists, for how we can make a living has changed dramatically and will certainly continue to evolve.  New paradigms are needed to prepare students for professional life.

I did apply to NE and MN, by the way, and was rejected by both.  But I am so glad!  Portland has become home to me like no other city in which I’ve ever lived. This city has inspired me to want to do more than just make art and be a traveling workshop presenter (every little potter’s dream, to be “famous”).  After two+ years of really living in the city (I live downtown), I better understand the importance of a strong, healthy community.  I’ve seen how design can have a profound effect on livability.  I want my career to have a direct connection with and positive effect on my community, and this program is uniquely designed (and perfectly located!) to help me do just that.

Art as a Career, Sale, Shows

Local 14 and Columbia Gorge Celebration

This year has been one of many firsts for me, including new shows and sales.  Just yesterday I sent off a piece (actually the one you see to the left) to be included in the Strictly Functional Pottery National, an annual show out of Lancaster, PA.  This past weekend I held a studio sale at the site of my first studio, Middle Mt. Pottery, outside Hood River, OR during the county’s annual Gravenstein apple celebration.  While traffic was not as heavy as other special weekends in Hood River County, many loyal friends and customers came out to support me…it warms my heart so!!

Next month (9/29-10/2) I will be participating in the Local 14 Show & Sale at the World Forestry Center in Portland, OR.  This is a fine art & craft sale put on by an all-women group of artists.  I was juried in as a guest artist for this year’s show.

A mere week after that (10/8-9) I will be one of eight featured artists in the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center (in The Dalles, OR) for the 25th anniversary celebration of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act.  During the day this free community event will include live music, art, living history, recreation, bike tours, local food & beer and more.  On Saturday evening, the Discovery Center will hold the 4th Annual Vintage Evening of Wine & Art, a fundraiser for the Center.  A piece of mine will be included in the auction.  Check out this page for tickets and other information.

Two weeks after the Discovery Center event I’ll be loading Soulgama!  Yikes, this is going to require a lot of pots…better get back to it!